Henri Rousseau

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on February 19, 2009 by florinorfolk

One artist who prefigured the Surrealists’ idea of fantasy with his fresh, naïve outlook on the world was the Frenchman, Henri Rousseau (1844-1910).

sleeping-gypsy
Sleeping Gypsy

Like Paul Klee, Rousseau defies all labels, and although he has been numbered among the Naïves or Primitives (two terms for untrained artists), he transcends this grouping. Known as Le Douanier, after a lifelong job in the Parisian customs office, Rousseau is a perfect example of the kind of artist in whom the Surrealists believed: the untaught genius whose eye could see much further than that of the trained artist.

dream
dream

eclaireur-attaque-par-un-tigre
Eclaireur attaque par un tigre

femme-se-promenant
Femme se promenant…

Paul Delvaux

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 23, 2009 by florinorfolk

secretwomen9-2006
The Secret of Women
paul-delvaux-1976_robe_de_mariee
Robe de Mariee

Paul Delvaux (September 23, 1897 – July 20, 1994) was a Belgian painter, famous for his surrealist paintings with female nudes.

The paintings Delvaux became famous for usually feature numbers of nude women who stare as if hypnotized, gesturing mysteriously, sometimes reclining incongruously in a train station or wandering through classical buildings, accompanied by skeletons or puzzled scientists. Delvaux would repeat variations on these themes for the rest of his long life, although some departures can be noted. Among them are his paintings of 1945-47, rendered in a flattened style with distorted and forced perspective effects, and the series of crucifixions and deposition scenes enacted by skeletons, painted in the 1950s.

In the late 1950s he produced a number of night scenes in which trains are observed by a little girl seen from behind. These compositions contain nothing overtly surrealistic, yet the clarity of moonlit detail is hallucinatory in effect. Trains had always been a subject of special interest to Delvaux, who never forgot the wonder he felt as a small child at the sight of the first electric trams in Brussels.

In 1959 he executed a mural at the Palais du Congrès in Brussels, one of several large scale decorative commissions Delvaux undertook. He was named director of the Académie royal des Beaux-arts of Belgium in 1965. In 1982 the Paul Delvaux Museum opened in Saint-Idesbald.
Delvaux died in Veurne in 1994.

delvaux-the-conversation
The Conversation

venus
Sleeping Venus

call-of-the-night
Call of the Night

James Ensor

Posted in Expressionism, James Ensor, symbolism with tags , , , , , , on December 28, 2008 by florinorfolk

(from : Wikipedia) James Sidney Edouard, Baron Ensor (April 13, 1860 – November 19, 1949) was a Belgian painter and printmaker, an important influence on expressionism and surrealism who lived in Ostend for almost his entire life. He was associated with the artistic group Les XX.

ensorintrigue

Ensor, Intrigue

ensormaks

Ensor, Strange Masks

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Ensor, Masks

Gustav Klimt

Posted in Art Nouveau, Klimt, portrait on December 8, 2008 by florinorfolk

Danae, gustav klimt
Danae, Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Art Nouveau (Vienna Secession) movement. His major works include paintings, murals, sketches, and other art objects, many of which are on display in the Vienna Secession gallery. Klimt’s primary subject was the female body,[1] and his works are marked by a frank eroticism–nowhere is this more apparent than in his numerous drawings in pencil. (source: Wikipedia)

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Adele Bloch-Bauer

gustav_klimt_kiss

The Kiss

Rogier van der Weyden

Posted in Netherlandish, portrait, Renaissance, Weyden with tags , , on September 24, 2008 by florinorfolk

Rogier van der Weyden, also known as Rogier de le Pasture (1399/1400 – June 18, 1464) is, with Jan van Eyck, considered one of the greatest exponents of the school of Early Netherlandish painting.

Portrait of a Lady (ca.1455)

Braque Family Tryptich (part)

Raffael

Posted in portrait, Raffael, Renaissance with tags , , , on August 22, 2008 by florinorfolk

(from: Wikipedia)  Raphael Sanzio, usually known by his first name alone (in Italian Raffaello)[1] (April 6 or March 28, 1483April 6, 1520)[2] was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance, celebrated for the perfection and grace of his paintings and drawings. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.

The dumb Lady

The Lady with the Unicorn

portrait of a young woman

The Brothers Limbourg

Posted in Brothers Limbourg, dutch renaissance, illustration, Renaissance, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 7, 2008 by florinorfolk

The brothers Paul, Herman and Johan Limbourg were descendants of the Maelwael-Limbourg lineage. Their story begins in Nijmegen, where they were born at the end of the 14th century. Their glory days began in France, first at the Burgundian court of Philip the Bold, and later at the court of the powerful Duke Jean de Berry.

The Limbourg brothers, or in Dutch Gebroeders van Limburg (Herman, Paul, and Johan; fl. 1385 – 1416), were famous Dutch Renaissance miniature painters from the city of Nijmegen. They were active in the early 15th century in France and Burgundy. They created what is certainly the best known late medieval illuminated manuscript, the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. (Wikipedia)

(All pictures copied from here)


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